Six Million Skeletons Stuffed Into The Tunnels

ADVERTISEMENTS ADVERTISEMENTS Paris might be the city of lights and love, but beneath its chic streets lies a dark labyrinth filled with the bones of 6 million Parisians. Just like many other booming cities of the early industrial age, Paris was suffering from problems, specifically death and disease. The promise of life in the big […]

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High Internet Use

Writing in World Psychiatry, an international team of researchers suggest that Internet use “can produce both acute and sustained” brain changes, specifically in areas associated with cognition. This means everything from memory recall to attention to sociability could be affected by our affinity for social media and Google search. Discover more: High Internet Use ADVERTISEMENTS

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Camera-Wearing Penguins

We’ve had sharkcam, whalecam, catcam, and now we have penguincam. Scientists love to attach cameras to creatures in a bid to understand what they get up to away from prying human eyes. Now, we’ve learned just a little bit more about the hunting habits of African penguins. Learn more: Camera-Wearing Penguins

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Microplastics

The average American consumes 1,314,000 calories, 152 pounds of sugar – and more than 74,000 microplastic particles every year. This is according to Canadian researchers, who – writing in Environmental Science & Technology – have reviewed 26 studies analyzing the number of microplastics found in fish, shellfish, added sugars, salts, alcohol, tap or bottled water, […]

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First US City To Decriminalize All Natural Psychedelics

Naturally-occurring hallucinogens such as magic mushrooms, ayahuasca, and certain mescaline-containing cacti have now been effectively decriminalized in Oakland, California after the city council voted unanimously in favor of a radical new resolution. The motion, which was passed on June 4, states that the city’s police force is to treat the investigation and arrest of adults […]

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Deep-Sea Dragonfish

Measuring just 15 centimeters (6 inches) in length, the dragonfish (Aristostomias scintillans) has an “enormous” jaw relative to their size capable of extending and opening to beyond that of a conventional jaw. It’s also lined with dozens of fang-like teeth sharper than those found in a piranha. To keep their prey in the dark, the […]

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Identifying “Weird Things” Washed Ashore

A close-up photo shows dozens of white, bone-like structures in the shape of wishbones attached to what appears to be one long, grey object. Facebook users rolled out a number of ideas ranging from pufferfish spines to eel vertebras in the comments section. According to Molly Zaleski, a marine biologist based in Alaska, she thinks […]

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The Moon’s Mysterious Flashes

Homo sapiens have looked at the Moon for tens of thousands of years, and yet our natural satellite continues to hold many secrets. Among them are the transient lunar phenomena. These events are varied in nature and origin: some are bright flashes on the Moon’s surface, others are a peculiar darkening, there are those that […]

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Fingerprints On Ancient Pottery

Pre-literate ancient societies seldom left us with much evidence of gender roles, but one team of researchers have found an innovative way to study the prehistoric division of labor. They’ve used prints left by potters’ fingers to show the ratio of men and women in this important trade shifted with time, challenging the idea that […]

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Medieval Chess Piece

A newly discovered medieval chess piece riddled with a history of equal parts fascination and mystery is set to head to auction later this summer. Bought for £5 by an Edinburgh antique dealer in the 1960s and having spent the last five decades stuffed in a dress drawer, Sotheby’s now estimates the 12th-century piece will […]

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